The League of Women Voters supports the following provisions: • Independent redistricting commissions in every state • Redistricting guidelines o Ensures communities of interest, neighborhoods be maintained o A partisanship test (efficiency gap) must be applied o Process must be transparent and allow for public participation o Plans must be enacted by a 3-judge court o Payments for the commission to operate must be made (???) • Same day registration • Automatic registration (already the case in 27 states) • Online voter registration • A commitment to restore the VRA (Voting Rights Act) that was rolled back with the Shelby County ruling. • An end to voter purges • Small donor public financing to level the playing field o Each donor’s contribution would be matched 1:6 from non-taxpayer funds in the Freedom from Influence Fund garnered from fines and seizures in court judgments o Participation by candidates would be voluntary o Transparency would increase by closing disclosure loopholes [$5B spent on 2018 elections, but much about donors has not been disclosed] o Federal Election Commission reform to enable it to function (5 commissioners so no tie votes, more staff, judges) • Ethics and transparency provisions for the executive and judicial branches

The League of Women Voters supports HR1, the For The People Act that passed the U.S. House of Representatives on March 8, 2019.   

Support HR1 For The People Act

The For The People Act is core to decades of League work.   This democracy reform bill will give states the resources to ensure the voting rights of all citizens.

The bill was introduced in the Senate on March 28, 2019 and is now in the Senate Finance Committee.  It could also go to the Judiciary Committee, the Rules Committee, and/or others before coming to the floor for a final vote. 

The League of Women Voters supports the following provisions:

  • Independent redistricting commissions in every state
  • Redistricting guidelines
    • Ensures communities of interest, neighborhoods be maintained
    • A partisanship test (efficiency gap) must be applied
    • Process must be transparent and allow for public participation
    • Plans must be enacted by a 3-judge court
    • Payments for the commission to operate must be made (???)
  • Same day registration
  • Automatic registration (already the case in 27 states)
  • Online voter registration
  • A commitment to restore the VRA (Voting Rights Act) that was rolled back with the Shelby County ruling.
  • An end to voter purges
  • Small donor public financing to level the playing field
    • Each donor’s contribution would be matched 1:6 from non-taxpayer funds in the Freedom from Influence Fund garnered from fines and seizures in court judgments
    • Participation by candidates would be voluntary
    • Transparency would increase by closing disclosure loopholes [$5B spent on 2018 elections, but much about donors has not been disclosed]
    • Federal Election Commission reform to enable it to function (5 commissioners so no tie votes, more staff, judges)
  • Ethics and transparency provisions for the executive and judicial branches

 

Natural Resources

IndyStar Article, “The White River Will Never Be Clean Until We Tackle This Filth Hiding in Plain Sight”

The IndyStar examines the issue of toxic runoff into the White River. While the article focuses on the effects on water quality in the Indianapolis area, the problem is widespread and affects us all.

https://www.indystar.com/in-depth/news/environment/2019/09/23/white-river-biggest-problem-hiding-plain-sight-toxic-stormwater-runoff-pollution/2207338001/?fbclid=IwAR1FNNk-m1EYVxODEzgnvqRttg4Ehr16CCiyDCDrfD0BpxyQr1TDV19uHwc

From the Sierra Club Newsletter:

Article: You Can’t Put a Price Tag on Life

The Trump administration’s proposal to dramatically weaken the Endangered Species Act amounts to death by a thousand cuts. If the administration has its way, profit-seeking will eventually eclipse the need to protect at-risk species.

Link: You Can’t Put a Price Tag on Life

From the Sierra Club Newsletter:

Campaign (form for submitting a message through the EPA Official Comment Docket on Water):

The Trump administration’s next attack on the Clean Water Act would keep your state from demanding that big polluters protect local waterways and drinking water sources. State governments and groups like the Sierra Club use Section 401 of the Clean Water Act to protect your local waterways.

Trump’s Coming for Your Local Waterways 

Climate Strike in Muncie

An older gentleman and a younger man sit side by side holding signs that say Climate Crisis! We demand action!

As part of the global climate strike held on Friday, September 20, approximately 25 activists from the  Muncie area gathered in front of the Delaware County Building at 4:00 pm. Ranging in age from under six months to over 70 years old, demonstrators drew attention to the need for governments worldwide to take measures to combat climate change. 

Drivers-by registered their support at the busy intersection by honking their horns as the lights changed.  

Friday, September 20

Demonstrators were supplemented by Muncie schools when the Homecoming Parade marched down Walnut Street. 

A group of protesters young and old march down the sidewalk holding signs demanding action on Climate Change.

The takeaway, in Muncie and across the globe, is clear:

If we hope to survive climate change, we must insist that governments devise and implement comprehensive, wide-ranging plans that effectively tackle it, before it’s too late.

 

Father and two children fishing off pier in Indiana pond

Calendar of Events

Get involved in protecting Indiana’s Natural Resources! 

November 2019

Saturday, November 16

HEC 12th Annual Greening the Statehouse

IMMI Conference Center, Westfield, IN

From HEC’s website: “the largest annual gathering of environmentally-minded Hoosiers. It is the year’s best chance to learn about upcoming legislative issues, engage with environmental public policy experts, and network with environmental-minded Hoosiers and green-minded businesses from across the state.”

HEC’s Greening the Statehouse website (to learn more and register): https://www.hecweb.org/gts/ 


Wednesday, November 13, 7:00-8:00 pm

 

Environmental Sustainability in Indiana

Monroe County Public Library, Bloomington, IN

“Learn how Indiana has progressed, where it stands today, and how to make your daily life as sustainable as possible.”

Monroe County Public Library Events Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/monroe-county-public-library-indiana/environmental-sustainabiliity-in-indiana/407151913245640/


Tuesday, November 12, 5:00-6:00 pm

 

Muncie Environmental Impact Committee Meeting

Muncie City Hall, Muncie, IN

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/2470711999840385/


Friday, November 1, 9-10:00 am
                 (repeats monthly to May 1)

 

IU Environmental Resilience Institute Climate Conversations

For more information, see the Environmental Resilience Institute Events website: https://events.iu.edu/eri/view/event/event_id/94368?utm_source=eri.iu.edu/events/index.html&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=framework&utm_term=standard&utm_content=2019-11-01-09-00-Climate%20Conversations 


CONTACT your Legislators to Register your Support for these Important Bills!

October, 2019

Public Transportation—SB285

SB285 is intended to enable communities across Indiana to raise dedicated funds for mass transit. (Public transportation lowers demand for fossil fuels and reduces carbon emissions contributing to climate change.)

 

Summary of SB285 (LegiScan.com):

Regional transit expansion.

Allows counties to impose an additional local income tax rate to fund the operations of a public transportation corporation and the operations of a rural transportation assistance program if the: (1) voters of the county approve a local public question; and (2) fiscal body of the county adopts an ordinance to impose the additional tax rate.

Provides that the rate must be at least 0.1% but not more than 0.25%. Excludes from this provision any county that is eligible to hold a referendum on funding transportation projects under the central Indiana public transportation projects statute.


 

CFO Regulation—HB1378

This legislation aims to impose, for the first time, air pollution limits on factory farms. It would also establish protective setbacks—a buffer zone between factory farms and nearby homes, public places, and environmentally-sensitive resources.

 

Summary of HB1378 (LegiScan.com):

Regulation of confined feeding operations.

Amends the law on confined feeding operations (CFOs), which include any confined feeding of at least 300 cattle, 600 swine or sheep, 30,000 fowl, or 500 horses.

Provides for the department of environmental management (IDEM) to issue CFO permits instead of “approvals.”

Provides that a person that owns a CFO, owns the livestock in a CFO, applies for a permit, permit renewal, or permit modification for a CFO, or is otherwise in direct or responsible charge of a CFO, is a “responsible party” with respect to the CFO and must disclose certain information.

Provides that a person may not start construction or operation of a CFO without obtaining a permit from IDEM and may not modify a CFO without obtaining a permit modification from IDEM.

Provides that the application for a permit or permit modification must be accompanied by: (1) plans and specifications prepared or certified by a professional engineer; (2) certain site-specific information; and (3) a site-specific air pollution control plan.

Requires IDEM to: (1) provide public access to a permit application through IDEM’s virtual file cabinet; (2) publish a notice requesting public comments on the application; (3) allow interested persons to submit written comments; and (4) hold a public hearing on the permit application upon written request.

Requires the commissioner of IDEM (commissioner) to deny an application for a permit or permit modification if the proposed activity would substantially endanger public health or the environment.

Authorizes IDEM to revoke a CFO permit if necessary to prevent or abate a substantial endangerment to public health or the environment.

Requires the environmental rules board (board) to adopt rules establishing: (1) limits on hydrogen sulfide, volatile organic compounds, and ammonia emissions; and (2) requirements and prohibitions applying to new CFOs, CFOs proposed for expansion, and other existing CFOs.

Provides that the rules must prohibit a new or expanded CFO from being located within one mile of a residence unless the owner of the residence consents to a lesser setback or the commissioner determines that the CFO’s air pollution control plan will prevent the CFO from exceeding the limits on hydrogen sulfide, volatile organic compounds, and ammonia emissions established by the rules of the board.

Makes technical corrections.


Net Metering—SB430 and HB1331

SB430 restores net metering, and HB1331 reduces burdens on potential solar panel owners who are part of homeowner associations.

 

Summary of SB430 (LegiScan.com):

Elimination of net metering phase out.

Eliminates provisions under which net metering (an arrangement under which an electric utility’s customer who has equipment for the production of electricity and who intermittently supplies electricity from that equipment to the electric utility is credited for the electricity that the customer supplies to the electric utility) would be partially ended by 2032 and completely ended by 2047.

Eliminates a limit on the aggregate amount of an electric utility’s net metering facility nameplate capacity that can be made available for customers’ participation in net metering.

Provides instead that the net metering facility nameplate capacity that an electric utility makes available for customers’ participation in net metering must be at least 3% of the electric utility’s most recent summer peak load.

Provides that, of the net metering facility nameplate capacity made available for customers’ participation in net metering, 30% must be reserved for participation by residential customers and not more than 5% must be reserved for participation by customers that install net metering facilities that use organic waste biomass.

 

Summary of HB1331 (LegiScan.com):

Homeowners associations.

Provides that, subject to certain specified exceptions, a homeowners association may not: (1) prohibit the owner of a dwelling unit from installing a solar energy system; (2) impose unreasonable limitations on the owner’s ability to install or use a solar energy system; or (3) require the removal of a solar energy system that has been installed.

Provides, however, that a homeowners association may require: (1) compliance with screening requirements imposed by the homeowners association; and (2) preapproval of the location of a solar energy system and of the manner in which the solar energy system is installed.

Applies only to rules, covenants, declarations of restrictions, and other governing documents adopted or amended by a homeowners association after June 30, 2019.

Provides that if a party to a dispute involving a homeowners association requests mediation, mediation is mandatory.

Provides that if neither party requests mediation, or if mediation is unsuccessful, a claimant may begin legal proceedings. Requires a mediation to be conducted in compliance with the Indiana supreme court rules for alternative dispute resolution.

Makes corresponding amendments to the provisions regarding grievance resolutions involving condominium associations.

 


Logging—SB610

Since 2005, 300-400% increases in logging have hurt wildlife habitats and hiking trails, also resulting in further damage caused by the growth of invasive plants and the construction of new gravel roads. Management plans must be developed for our state forests that require the exemption of a minimum of 10% of forested land from logging activity. SB610 offers a plan to limit logging in Indiana state forests.

 

Summary of SB610 (LegiScan.com):

State forest commission and management plan.

Establishes a state forest commission. Specifies the membership of the commission. Requires the commission to meet in 2019, 2020, and 2021 and to issue a written report establishing a plan for the management of the state forests for the 100-year period beginning in 2022.

Provides that the commission’s plan must contain certain recommendations and must embody certain principles.

Requires the state forest commission to set forth in its report the subjects discussed and issues raised concerning which the general assembly may choose to pass legislation.

Requires the natural resources commission to adopt rules incorporating the state forest commission’s determination about the percentage of state forest land falling within each of the three “priority use” categories.

Requires the natural resources commission, every seven years, to conduct a review of the implementation of the state forest commission’s plan and to adopt rules to revise the plan, as appropriate.

 

Legislators to contact to voice your support for SB610:

Melanie Wright is a member of the committee and local legislator; Jean Leising is the committee chairman; and committee members Mike Crider, Susan Glick, Don Lehe, and J. D. Prescott are opposed to the proposed changes in logging, and they need to hear from us.

 

The Complexity Index

School children studying chemistry
Image from ICPE Notes

 – and why you should care about it

 

Why does it cost more
to educate children
who live in poverty?

  1. Children who grow up in homes of poverty have fewer early childhood educational opportunities.
  2. Children in single-parent homes, or homes where parents have to work evenings, more often experience deficits in language development.
  3. Children who grow up in poverty start school significantly behind their wealthier peers.
  4. Children who grow up in poverty are less likely to be exposed to adults with advanced educational degrees.
  5. Impoverished parents cannot afford the cost of additional tutoring or even transportation to the public library or their school for additional support.
  6. Students who grow up in poverty are more likely to experience medical and emotional trauma.
  7. Public schools that serve the highest proportion of students of poverty need to provide more resources for academic aides, tutoring staff, nurses and social workers than are needed in schools serving wealthy families.
  8. Schools of poverty need to provide more after-school and summer remediation programs.
  9. Schools of poverty need to offer competitive salaries to attract and hold highly qualified teachers.

 

Find out more in this article by Dr. Tony Lux, school superintendent

What is the complexity index?

The Indiana General Assembly establishes a per-pupil basic tuition support amount for each budget year. Multiply that times the district’s number of students (ADM) on count day in the fall and spring, and it is the state-funded amount school districts receive for general classroom expenses, including teacher pay.

The complexity index is a component of school funding that allocates additional money to school districts based upon the number of disadvantaged students served.It is based on a district’s poverty level and other factors. 

Why is the complexity index important now?

Some legislators are again asking why disadvantaged students need additional funding beyond the basic school formula.

What you can do about it?

Understand the issues and discuss them with people in your social circles.

#EducateOthers 

 

These posts are taken from the newsletter of the LWV of Upper Mississippi River Region. We think our community will be interested in these informative articles and videos. Please follow the links for the full stories!

Climate Change – What does it mean for Iowa?

Dr. Erv Klaas told us about the impact of climate change on Iowa, especially focusing on the extreme rainfall and flooding that is occurring now.  In this talk, Dr. Klaas links warmer waters in the Gulf of Mexico with increased humidity and in turn more rainfall. 

Click here for video!

Soil health, climate change and adaptation

Dr. Jean Eells

Soil Health Explained

Dr. Jean Eells met with the LWV UMRR Board and guests, sharing her expansive knowledge of adult learning styles as she talked about soil health. Dr. Eells discussed the different ways that women and men  respond to information, and how best to reach women with soil health messaging.  

Click here for the post, including video.

Climate Adaptation – Threat and Opportunity

In this guest post, Matt Doll from the Minnesota Environmental Partnership looks at opportunities that exist for farmers in this time of changing climate.  One big idea who’s time may be coming is Kernza, a perennial variety of wheat.  

Link to full article

 

Forgotten Foremothers

Profiles of lesser-known heroines in the fight for women’s rights

By Kathryn S. Gardiner


Victoria Earle Matthews

A woman freed from slavery by the 13th Amendment authored works on the arduous internal struggles of life, including forgiving oppressors, while she actively worked to improve the lives of women of color in the post-war era.


“The quick, vengeful flame leaped in her eyes, as her mind, made keen by years of secret suffering and toil, traveled through time and space; she saw wrongs which no tongue can enumerate; demoniac gleams of exultation and bitter hatred settled up her now grim features; a pitiless smile wreathed her set lips, as she gazed with glaring eyeballs at the helpless, hopeless ‘victim of the great fire,’ as though surrounded by demons; a dozen wicked impulses rushed through her mind—a life for a life—no mortal eye was near…”

 

Though Aunt Lindy is Victoria’s only short story still easily available to the public, records of her other writings reveal multiple tales of forgiveness.

 

As a writer, Victoria Earle Matthews told the story of Aunt Lindy, a woman—once enslaved, but now free—who finds herself alone with her former master. The man is gravely injured in a fire and entirely at Lindy’s mercy. And mercy it indeed becomes as Victoria’ protagonist fights against the “vengeful flame” and instead heals the man. She is rewarded for this by the man’s changed soul and the return of one of the sons who had been stolen from her by that same slave owner.

 

Though Aunt Lindy is Victoria’s only short story still easily available to the public, records of her other writings reveal multiple tales of forgiveness. “Matthews’s career,” reads the Oxford Reference, “was driven by a belief in converting her people’s internal devastations into brilliant external accomplishments.” It would be a story Victoria would play out in her own life, and one she had to begin the day she was born in slavery in Fort Valley, Ga., on May 27, 1861. Her mother was an enslaved woman named Caroline Smith and her father was likely the man who claimed them both as property.

 

The homeowner caught Victoria reading and fortunately did not condemn the practice.

 

While Victoria (born Ella Victoria Smith) was still young, mother Caroline fled Georgia for New York at the start of the Civil War, leaving Victoria and an older sister behind. However, she returned in 1869 and mother and daughters reunited. Now emancipated, all three relocated to New York City.

 

For a brief time in this new city, Victoria attended public school, but the small family’s financial pressures soon forced her to drop out and gain work as a domestic servant. The home in which Victoria worked had an expansive library. The homeowner caught Victoria reading and fortunately did not condemn the practice. Victoria was granted permission to read after her work was done. Victoria, of course, began to work much faster to make time for reading.

 

“When home has been devastated, hearts only may feel and know the extent of the void; no pen or phrase can estimate it,” wrote Victoria…

 

At age 18, Victoria married William E. Matthews, a coachman, and the two had a son they named Lamartine. As a young wife and mother, Victoria started working to establish herself as a journalist and writer. Those ambitions blended well with her greater interest in politics and she turned her focus to the struggle of African Americans following the Civil War. In 1892, she co-organized a testimonial dinner for Ida B. Wells and her anti-lynching campaign. These events lead to the creation of the Woman’s Loyal Union of New York and Brooklyn. Victoria would serve as the first president of the WLU, a civil rights organization.

 

In September of 1895, Victoria would be challenged once again by the pain life can bring when son Lamartine died around the age of 16. “When home has been devastated, hearts only may feel and know the extent of the void; no pen or phrase can estimate it,” wrote Victoria in Aunt Lindy. With this tragedy still fresh, she turned her energies to helping young people Lamartine’s age, including a brief return to the South where she looked into what educational opportunities were provided to black citizens and immigrants. Soon enough, though, a minister persuaded her to return to those in need in New York.

…she noted the specific issues plaguing the cities African Americans, namely “limited economic opportunities, inadequate housing, poverty, prejudice, and racially motivated violence,”

Victoria spent her time as a leader and an organizer, but never lost sight of the day-to-day practical challenges of life. In neighborhoods where need seemed the greatest, she would go house to house, offering whatever help she could, from laundry to making family meals for overworked mothers. In this intensive work, she noted the specific issues plaguing the cities African Americans, namely “limited economic opportunities, inadequate housing, poverty, prejudice, and racially motivated violence,” she said.

 

Victoria’s own relationship with racial prejudice was a curious one. As a woman of mixed race, her features favored her white ancestry. This fair-skinned appearance, as well as her education, allowed her to move through circles of society often locked to her peers with darker skin regardless of their background or education. Victoria, however, consistently aligned with African Americans of every community and took great pride in her race. At the time, she was best known for her speeches “The Value of Race Literature” and “The Role of Afro-American Women,” both of which were rooted in her racial pride and sense of self-worth.

…when Victoria observed that new arrivals to the city, especially women, were often victimized at the train station, she arranged for volunteers to meet new people and escort them to safe housing.)

Victoria Earle Matthews

“and the memory of their oppressors awoke but to the call of fitful retrospection.”

As Jim Crow laws tightened in the South, more and more black men and women moved North looking for work and opportunity. In this Great Migration, Victoria spied a need within all the need—namely that of the young women who lacked safe places to stay and job skills. She soon provided those in the form of an apartment house, afforded with the help with Winthrop Phelps, a white philanthropist. The White Rose Industrial Home for Working Class Negro Girls opened on Feb. 11, 1897, providing young black women a home and training in domestic work. (Revealing her eye for detail, when Victoria observed that new arrivals to the city, especially women, were often victimized at the train station, she arranged for volunteers to meet new people and escort them to safe housing.)

 

“…in the busy life that freedom gave them, oft, when work was done and the night of life threw its waning shadows around them, their tears would fall for the scattered voices—they would mourn o’er their past oppression,” Victoria wrote in Aunt Lindy. “Yet they hid their grief from an unsympathizing generation, and the memory of their oppressors awoke but to the call of fitful retrospection.”

 

Victoria died at only age 45 in New York City on March 10, 1907, but what she’d begun would have no end. The White Rose Industrial Home, also known as the White Rose Mission, became the blueprint for similar organizations such as the YMCA and other programs still in operation to this day.

 

Waelz Sustainable Products blocked from Polluting Muncie

City Council Institutes Environmental Impact Committee

American Electric Power Agrees to Implement Pollution Control

The Muncie–Delaware County community has two important reasons to celebrate this summer: first, the reversal of a decision that would have damaged public health and well-being, and second, the institution of a governmental safeguard that will help prevent similar threats in the future.

Waelz Sustainable Products (WSP)

Muncie is Safe-r

Waelz Sustainable Products (WSP) sought and received City support for a facility installation at the site of the former Borg-Warner plant. While the project was presented as a positive development for Muncie, as a recycling project that would provide jobs, it would have also led to the release of hazardous environmental pollutants, contaminating the region with lead, mercury, dioxin, and dangerous particulates.

Over 600 local residents turned out to protest the project at the Muncie City Council meeting on August 5th. Also, citizens organized and attended meetings on the issue, signed petitions, wrote letters to the editor, and contacted local and state legislators. In response to overwhelming community opposition, WSP’s plans to install the factory were withdrawn—a big win for area residents, whose lives will be healthier as a result.

But the win didn’t end there. Because residents demonstrated not only that the community is strongly engaged in issues of public health and environmental, but also that elected officials will be held accountable to their constituents for the decisions they make on our behalf, the City Council has instituted an environmental impact committee. This committee will be responsible for reviewing new proposed projects that might negatively affect air, soil, and water quality in the area. Its members are required to seek advice from professionals before making decisions that would affect environmental conditions.

Not only did Muncie and Delaware County citizens successfully overturn a decision that would have compromised our overall health and well-being for years to come, but we also demonstrated that “we, the people” do indeed have a powerful voice—that when we insist on being heard, we can help direct community development in ways that enhance our quality of life rather than jeopardize it.

For more information, follow these links to coverage by the StarPress:

comprehensive collection of links

environmental committee creation

A planned steel-dust recycling facility in Muncie would look similar to this one. (Photo: Waelz Sustainable Products)

AEP Commits to Retire Largest Coal Unit

More good news on the environmental front: American Electric Power Corporation has signed a legal agreement to implement increased pollution controls that will reduce sulfur dioxide emissions from its two Rockport power plants in Spencer, Indiana, by at least 58%. Furthermore, one of the two units is scheduled for complete retirement by December 31, 2028, which is expected to prevent the ejection of 9 million metric tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere—the equivalent of removing 2 million cars from the road. In addition, the company will provide $3.5 million to fund projects aimed at improving energy efficiency and pollution reduction.

For more information, see the Sierra Club article at https://www.sierraclub.org/press-releases/2019/07/american-electric-power-commits-retire-largest-coal-unit-beyond-coal-campaign.

The Ball State University Vietnam Moratorium Committee is presenting “Reunite, Remember, Rekindle,”
its 50th Anniversary Reunion and Conference, and the Public is Invited!

The events will honor the history of student activism at
Ball State during the Vietnam era, but just as importantly,
they are aimed at connecting with activists in current student movements.

Ball State University

Vietnam Moratorium Committee


50th Anniversary Reunion and Conference

The Reunion Mixer and Dinner

 will be held
at BSU’s Alumni Center Assembly Hall 
on Thursday, October 10
from 6:00-10:30 pm.

The $40 fee includes choice of entreé
and a commemorativet-shirt,
with paid registration due by October 1.

For Tickets

The all-day Conference

 on Friday, October 11,
from 9:00 am–5:30 pm
at Pittenger Student Center’s Cardinal Hall, 
is free of charge and open to the public.

 

The Conference will present a full day of panels and speakers.

David Harris
will present the keynote address at 11:30 am

He is  a veteran anti-war activist, journalist, author of 11 books, and continuing peace advocate.

For More Information

 

Voter Services September 2019

Voter Service has been busy this past month.  We have registered voters at the Moms Demand Action anti-gun violence rally, the Second Harvest Food Bank, the Ride for the Mounds, and the Old Washington Street Festival. At the Old Washington Street Festival we had people tell us they were specifically looking for our booth so they could register the new voters in their families or ask questions about voting laws.   The community knows us for our good work!

We have also been working on setting up community forums so the candidates in the November election for local offices can answer questions from the citizens of Muncie.  We are sponsoring a City Council Candidate Forum, and are helping the NAACP with a Mayoral Forum.  Both will be live broadcast on WLBC, and a rebroadcast will be available online after the Forums are over.  We hope to see you all at both of these events!

 

 

Mayoral Candidate Forum  

The NAACP is sponsoring a debate on

October 10    

7:00 pm         

Church of the Living God

City Council Candidate Forum

October 17    

7:00 pm         

Northside Middle School