Forgotten Foremothers

Kathryn S. Gardiner

Author and visionary of this LWV series “Forgotten Foremothers”

 

     Kathryn S. Gardiner received her bachelor’s degree in Telecommunications from Ball State University and her master’s degree in Screenwriting from Hollins University in Roanoke, Va. From 2007 to 2015, Kathryn was the editor of special products for the Hoosier Times in Bloomington, In. There, she spearheaded The South-Central Indiana Wedding Guide, H&L, INstride, BizNet, and Adventure Indiana. She spent more than three years as an amateur mixed martial arts fighter, “retiring” in 2011 with a record of 2-2 (or 3-2, if you count her Muay Thai bout in Las Vegas, which she likes to).

     Kathryn became a member of the League of Women Voters in 2016, joining her parents who have been members since her childhood.

 

 

 

 

 

She currently teaches screenwriting at Ball State and lives with a marvelous tabby cat named Cairo.

 

Mary Church Turrell

“Lifting As We Climb”

“…surely nowhere in the world do oppression and persecution based solely on the color of the skin appear more hateful and hideous than in the capital of the United States,” she wrote in What It Means To Be Colored in the Capital of the United States, “because the chasm between the principles upon which this Government was founded, in which it still professes to believe, and those which are daily practiced under the protection of the flag, yawns so wide and deep.”

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Madam C. J. Walker

Self-made millionaire

“This is the greatest country under the sun,”

“but we must not let our love of country, our patriotic loyalty, cause us to abate one whit in our protest against wrong and injustice.

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Victoria Earle Matthews

Victoria Earle Matthews

 

A woman freed from slavery by the 13th Amendment authored works on the arduous internal struggles of life, including forgiving oppressors, while she actively worked to improve the lives of women of color in the post-war era.

Self-made millionaire

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Matilda Joslyn Gage

Matilda Joslyn Gage

“The Matilda Effect”

“There is a word sweeter than Mother, Home or Heaven.
That word is Liberty.”

“A very slight investigation proves,” wrote Gage in “Woman as Inventor,” an article published in The North American Review in 1870, “that patents taken out in some man’s name are, in many instances, due to women.

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Coralie Franklin Cook

The Women Suffrage Association, she wrote,

“had turned its back on the woman of color.”

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Rose Pengelly @ the Women’s Hall exhibition @ Tower Hamlets Local History Library 

Rose Pengelly

With her bravery, youth, and activism, she earned the nickname

“Little Sylvia” after notable suffragette leader Sylvia Pankhurst.

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Nannie Helen Burroughs

“Who’s that young girl?” a man in the audience is quoted as saying.

“Why don’t she sit down? She’s always talking. She’s just an upstart.”

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Rosa May Billinghurst

Billinghurst, in her three-wheeled chair, was a frequent sight at peaceful protests organized by the WSPU.

However, she was no stranger to the more militant protests—and the police.

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Celia, A Slave by Melton A McLaurinMelton A. McLaurin

Celia, A Slave

Asserted Control Over Her Own Body by suing the slave owner who raped her

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Melvina Walker and Nellie Cressall. Photograph: Norah Smyth/Institute of Social History

Melvina Walker

“She seemed to me like a woman of the French Revolution,”

Sylvia Pankhurst said of Walker’s fiery speaking style.

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Daisy Bates

“You’re filled with hatred. Hate can destroy you, Daisy,”

Orlee said to her as he lay on his deathbed.

“Don’t hate white people just because they’re white.

If you hate, make it count for something.”

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Misses Rollin

“If you want a thorough posting upon political affairs in South Carolina, you must call on the Rollins.”

“We ask suffrage not as a favor, not as a privilege, but as a right based on the grounds that we are human begins and as such entitled to all human rights, said Charlotte.

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Fannie Lou Hamer

“If this is a Great Society, I’d hate to see a bad one.”

Melvina Walker and Nellie Cressall. Photograph: Norah Smyth/Institute of Social History

Hamer returned to her plantation home in Mound Bayou. There, she found her “boss man raisin’ Cain,” she recalled, and he demanded she withdraw her registration because “we’re not ready for that in Mississippi.”

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