Waelz Zinc Processing Facility to Replace Borg-Warner

Muncie City Council tonight voted to assign study of the Waelz Zinc Processing facility to a committee that will invite testimony from scientists and citizens. 

The committee will then recommend a revised ordinance or rescind the original ordinance. 
They will hold a public hearing—date TBA.   

 

Put this on your calendar too!

 Waelz Zinc Processing facility public meeting

Tuesday, August 20

—see notice below-

July 31, 2019 Contact: Ali Alavi - 317-334-7067 WSP understands the concerns being expressed by the Muncie community regarding the proposed new zinc production facility. We want to emphatically reiterate our commitment to the protection of human health and the environment with respect to our planned operation - a core value of the two partners in WSP - and continuing to communicate and engage with our neighbors. We are targeting Tuesday August 20, 2019, for our next meeting with the community during which additional details regarding the project can be presented in a setting more conducive to personal interaction with members of the community. The more intimate setting will allow WSP representatives the opportunity to answer questions, address concerns and provide facts and accurate information we are confident will prove reassuring to its neighbors. We are keenly aware of the specific questions circulating in the community regarding mercury emissions and want to be lear that the facility will operate in compliance with environmental laws and in accordance with air regulations and its final air permit, all of which ensures an operation that protects human health and the envirnment. IDEM will not issue a final air permit without ensuring the safety and health of area residents. We support Representative Errington and Senator Lananes idea of IDEM holding a public hearing when the draft air permit is issued and continuing to carry out its mission of acting in the best interests of the citizens of Indiana.

Muncie City Council Meeting Aug 5, 2019

Various photographers

Girl holds sign with concerns over possible pollution from Zinc Oxide plant
Man wears high quality dust protection mask and protective plastic suit
Boy holds sign that reads “Don’t poison the air. We like it here.”
Man holds sign questioning Muncie allowing Toxic Steel Dust in our community
Boy and man hold signs outside Muncie City Council meeting in protest of Waelz factory
Overflow crowd waiting outside The Muncie City building at Aug 5, 2019 City Council meeting
Rally at Muncie City Council on August 5, 2019

Democracy is not a spectator sport

Videos of the City Council meeting on Aug 5, 2019, coverage of the upcoming meeting on Channel 6, and a video of children chanting “Please don’t poison us!”

Video of The Muncie City Council meeting

Video: After Council President left the building

Channel 6 was covering the rally but missed the fireworks at the end of the meeting.

The Indy Channel

 

Photos from Josh Arthur’s post in Change of Plans Click picture to visit the event on Facebook
  • regulation of pollution sources by control and penalties;

  • inspection and monitoring;

  • full disclosure of pollution data;

  • incentives to accelerate pollution control;

GUN SAFETY

Responding to the latest in a long series of bloodletting that the American people across the country have endured, Chris Carson, President of the League of Women Voters of the United States, stated:

 

I think we all must acknowledge our anger and frustration that this kind of slaughter can continue under the guise of ‘constitutional rights’. But getting past that entirely justifiable outrage, we need to continue to work for legislation that promotes gun safety.

However – we all need to acknowledge that this is really about Voting Rights. Unless all American citizens can vote, we are not going to get past this. Until barriers to voting are eliminated – Voter ID, restrictive registration requirements, gerrymandering – are eliminated, we can’t pass legislation that will make a difference. It all comes back to the vote.

~ Chris Carson, President of the League of Women Voters of the United States

Redistricting Update

Issue after issue that arises

—education, gun violence, environmental concerns—reminds us that we need legislators and local officials who will respond to and work with constituents.

 

Unless all American citizens can vote, and know that their votes will count, we are not going to get past this crisis of democracy.

While we work to reduce barriers to voting, we continue to work for redistricting reform.

Take the End Gerrymandering Pledge and Pass it On…

We’ve got to spend this summer and fall doing what we can to keep redistricting reform on the General Assembly’s radar screen.  One of the best and easiest ways to do that is to take the End Gerrymandering Pledge

  http://www.endgerrymanderingpledge.org  

Send above link to your local officials

Our Muncie City Council passed our coalition resolution for redistricting reform in September 2016, but it’s time to remind them too.  Send the link to the pledge to your city council and county commission members and ask them to take a stand for fair districts. 

Your Government Officials

 

Politicians Lose More Gerrymandering Cases in Court. Nearly 90 percent of maps drawn by independent commissions are upheld. Nearly 40 percent of maps drawn by politicians require court intervention. Common Cause. CLC Advancing Democracy Through Law

Politician Map Makers Keep Courts Busy

An interesting, but not surprising analysis by the Campaign Legal Center and Common Cause finds that:

States where politicians draw the maps are more likely to have their maps challenged in court than states that have a more independent redistricting process.  Read more here

https://www.commoncause.org/democracy-wire/politicians-lose-more-gerrymandering-cases-courts/

Thanks to the Hoosier Environmental Council, this is for those of you who will want to…

Speak Out for Our National Forests

The Trump Administration is proposing to dramatically weaken the rules that govern environmental review and public input for management activities in America’s national forests. The result, if these changes become final, is that major forest management projects including logging and road building that affect thousands of acres will be virtually exempt from environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act. Furthermore, the public will lose its opportunity for meaningful input into these management decisions. For Indiana’s Hoosier National Forest, every logging project over the last 15 years would have been excluded from public comment and environmental analysis requirements under the proposed rules.

Take Action: 

Read our blog and take action today. Comments are due by August 12th.

The blog reference is:

https://www.hecweb.org/2019/07/31/trump-administration-seeks-to-reduce-oversight-and-public-notice-for-national-forest-logging-projects/

At the end of the blog you can click on the “public participation portal” that gets you to a quick way to submit your individual comment. 

 

Liz Solberg and Dave Simcox, on behalf also of Lisa Harris and Jeanette Neagu
LWVIN Natural Resources Advocacy Coordination

Foregotten Foremothers

Profiles of lesser-known heroines in the fight for women’s rights

By Kathryn S. Gardiner

Madam C.J. Walker, Self-made Millionaire

Madam C.J. Walker, Self-made Millionaire

In July 1917, a riot erupted in East Saint Louis. White workers responded with violence as factories in the area, especially those with government contracts, hired more and more black laborers. History has recorded the event as one of the worst race riots ever in the United States. White men fired weapons on homes in black neighborhoods, beating and lynching all black individuals they came across. The aggression of the white community resulted in over 40 deaths and nearly 6,000 families driven from their houses.

Madam CJ Walker.com

Responses from African-American leaders and organizations were swift and public. Among them was a gathering of Harlem business leaders, including Madam C.J. Walker, the influential owner of The Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company and believed to be the wealthiest African-American woman in the United States.

Like many women of the era, Sarah suffered from dandruff and hair loss caused by the harsh lye-based soaps used in cleaning clothes and hair.

Madam C.J. Walker was born Sarah Breedlove on Dec. 23, 1867 to Owen and Minerva Breedlove in Louisiana. She was one of six children and the first born after the Emancipation Proclamation granted freedom to enslaved people in the country. By the age of seven, Sarah was an orphan and living with a sister and her husband. Sarah married Moses McWilliam in 1882 at age 14. The marriage was likely a means to escape abuse at the hands of her brother-in-law. With Moses, Sarah gave birth to her only child, a daughter the couple named A’Lelia. Moses died just two years later. Sarah remarried in 1894 but left that husband a few years later.

Both with and between husbands, Sarah was never idle. She and her daughter relocated to St. Louis, Mo., where three of her brothers had settled. Sarah earned a living as a laundress and a cook, making barely a dollar a day. She was determined, however, to earn enough to fund her daughter’s formal education. (She herself had only three months of Sunday school literacy lessons.) A single woman, she sang with the choir at the St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church and enjoyed the company of a community of women.

It was within this company that the seed for Sarah’s business would take root. Like many women of the era, Sarah suffered from dandruff and hair loss caused by the harsh lye-based soaps used in cleaning clothes and hair. Most Americans also did not have adequate plumbing, further contributing to health and hygiene issues. Sarah’s brothers worked as barbers and she first studied haircare with them.

In 1904, Sarah attended the Louisiana Purchase Exposition (also known as the World’s Fair) as a commission agent for Annie Malone, an African-American entrepreneur who had founded the Poro Company, distributing haircare products. Malone would become Sarah’s mentor and eventually her primary business rival. Sarah and A’Lelia moved to Denver, Co., in 1905 where Sarah began developing her own hair care products in earnest.

Walker ensured that African-American women were trained in the “Walker System” of hair care and encouraged to become sales agents. Her saleswomen earned a considerable commission and she employed women at all levels of management.

In January of 1906, Sarah married Charles Joseph Walker, who worked in newspaper advertising in St. Louis. It was from this union that Sarah claimed the name Madam C.J. Walker, adopting the “Madam” from the women who pioneered the French cosmetics industry. She began working as an independent hairdresser and cosmetics retailer. Husband Charles was a partner in the business and helped with the marketing while daughter A’Lelia, now in her early 20s, ran the mail-order operation. When A’Lelia and her husband moved to Pittsburgh, a branch of the Madam C.J. Walker operations relocated with her.

Walker’s company would soon cross the country. In addition to its facilities in Pittsburgh, Walker also established a salon in Harlem, which would go on to become a center of black culture. Wherever her company took root, Walker ensured that African-American women were trained in the “Walker System” of hair care and encouraged to become sales agents. Her saleswomen earned a considerable commission and she employed women at all levels of management. Each sales agent wore a distinctive uniform of a white shirt and a black skirt, carrying with her a black satchel as she visited homes all throughout the United States and the Caribbean.

“I am a woman who came from the cotton fields of the South,” she said, speaking in 1912 at the National Negro Business League. “… I promoted myself into the business of manufacturing hair goods and preparations. I have built my own factory on my own ground.”

In 1910, Sarah and husband Charles moved to Indianapolis, Ind., where A’Lelia encouraged her mother to establish a factory head. Walker did so, purchasing a home and a factory at 640 North West Street. She and Charles divorced in 1913, but Sarah retained the name Madam C.J. Walker. After all, it was a brand now. Her name and likeness graced the packages of Madam C.J. Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower. Walker was savvy in advertising and branding, and she traveled frequently to promote her products.

“I am a woman who came from the cotton fields of the South,” she said, speaking in 1912 at an annual gathering of the National Negro Business League. “From there I was promoted to the washtub. From there I was promoted to the cook kitchen. And from there I promoted myself into the business of manufacturing hair goods and preparations. I have built my own factory on my own ground.” The following year she would attend the event as keynote speaker.

By 1917—the year of the horrific riots in East St. Louis—her company had several thousand sales agents and would claim to have trained 20,000 women in the “Walker System.” Harlem business leaders responded to the violence with a visit to the White House, brandishing a petition in support of anti-lynching legislation. Walker also served on the committee that organized the Negro Silent Protest Parade that walked through New York City streets.

“This is the greatest country under the sun,” she said to her agents, “but we must not let our love of country, our patriotic loyalty, cause us to abate one whit in our protest against wrong and injustice.

Arcadia Madam Walker Theatre Cover

Alelia Bundles.com

“We should protest until the American sense of justice is so aroused that such affairs of the East St. Louis riots be forever impossible.”

Walker addressed the violence later that year at a gathering of the Madam C.J. Walker Hair Culturists Union of America in Philadelphia, a gathering which may have been the first national meeting of businesswomen. “This is the greatest country under the sun,” she said to her agents, “but we must not let our love of country, our patriotic loyalty, cause us to abate one whit in our protest against wrong and injustice. We should protest until the American sense of justice is so aroused that such affairs of the East St. Louis riots be forever impossible.”

As her business grew, so did Walker’s activism. Just in Indianapolis, she raised funds to establish the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) and contributed money to the Flanner House and Bethel African American Methodist Episcopal Church.

At the time of her death in 1919 due to a cerebral hemorrhage, Walker was touted as a millionaire. However, according to her obituary in The New York Times, “she said herself two years ago [1917] that she was not yet a millionaire but hoped to be sometime.” In 1919, the average American’s annual salary was $750. Instructions in her will bequeathed nearly two-thirds of her estate’s future profits to charity. A’Lelia took over the company and ran it until her death in 1931 from the same affliction which claimed her mother.

The original home of Madam C.J. Walker’s Manufacturing Company is now The Madam Walker Theatre Center.

Madam C.J. Walker’s name was known all throughout the United States and the Caribbean, far beyond her death and even to this day. While she was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, many remembrances remain in Indianapolis, the city she chose for her company headquarters. Her personal papers have been preserved at the Indiana Historical Society and a container of Madam C.J. Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower remains in the permanent collection at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. The original home of Madam C.J. Walker’s Manufacturing Company is now The Madam Walker Theatre Center.

Before her own young passing, A’Lelia wrote a biography of her mother titled On Her Own Ground. This text is the basis for an upcoming Netflix series about Madam C.J. Walker starring Octavia Spencer. 

Change of Plans: Mercury, Lead in our Systems

 

Josh Arthur > ‎Change of Plans – Mercury, Lead in Our Systems Yesterday at 10:04 AM · Public · in Photos from Josh Arthur’s post in Change of Plans – Mercury, Lead in Our Systems

CITY HALL – MONDAY – 7:30p – 8/5

Please change your Monday plans so you and your people can attend. We want to show 1000 strong in solidarity for the future of our community.

As you’ve read, there are plans for the largest facility emitting airborne mercury pollution in the United States to open on Kilgore. It would be 15th in the United States in lead emissions. That’s 5x more lead than Exide, and 10x more particulates than Exide.

 

*Consider asking council members to reconsider their votes in favor of tax abatement for this proposed facility.*

 

Our council members would love to hear your thoughts about this:

Map of Districts:

http://www.cityofmuncie.com/documents/MuncieCityCouncilDistricts_2017-1.jpg

Districts 1-3

Doug Marshall
District #1
dougmarshall@comcast.net
district1@cityofmuncie.com
(765)702-7951

Dan Ridenour
District #2
dan.ridenour@yahoo.com
district2@cityofmuncie.com
(765)760-2118

Lynn Peters
District #3
district3@cityofmuncie.com
(765)729-8138

Districts 4-6

Brad Polk
District #4
bpolkdist4@gmail.org
district4@cityofmuncie.com
(765)717-5498

Jerry Dishman
District #5
dishjd@netscape.net
district5@cityofmuncie.com
(765)215-9747

Julius Anderson
District #6
jjanders125@gmail.com
district6@cityofmuncie.com
(765)289-6639

Districts At-Large

Denise Moore
At-Large
dmoore1956@hotmail.com
(765)215-1660

Linda Gregory
At-Large
lindagregory@comcast.net
(765)286-2925

Nora Powell
At-Large
npowellmuncie@gmail.com
(765)284-3991

 

Please stay up to date with this event as more content is added.

Further details for the City Council meeting and contacting IDEM are forthcoming on Facebook.

https://m.facebook.com/events/374940503196029/?active_tab=about

Expect Beautiful


2019 White River Cleanup:  September 21

Muncie-Delaware Clean and Beautiful has announced September 21 for the White River Cleanup from 8AM to 12PM at Westside Park.  Registration will be available July 2019.

From beautifulmuncie.org

The White River Cleanup happens each September, and is a statewide public service event stretching along much of the White River.  Many counties including Delaware, Hamilton, Monroe, Madison and Morgan Counties participate in cleaning up the White River on or near the same date.  Thousands of pounds of trash are removed every year including large amounts of tires.

Volunteers walk the bank, river and land where possible removing debris from and around the river. When that is not possible, volunteers use canoes to navigate through the water filling them up along the way with the debris they find.

The White River Cleanup is sponsored by the Stormwater Management Department and organized by Muncie-Delaware Clean & Beautiful.

2019 White River Cleanup:

  September 21

from 8AM to 12PM at Westside Park
Registration will be available July 2019

Muncie-Delaware Clean and Beautiful

Visit

beautifulmuncie.org

 

Ride for the Mounds:

September 14, 2019

Bicycle distances are 15, 25, 45 miles.

Show your support for Mounds Greenway by joining Ride for the Mounds on September 14, 2019, 12 noon, at Canoe Country in Daleville.  Tour the Mounds Greenway Corridor to see all the greenway seeks to conserve and connect.  Bicycle distances are 15, 25, 45 miles.

Canoe Country in Daleville

September 14, 2019, 12 noon, at Canoe Country in Daleville.

Online Information:

http://www.moundsgreenway.com

Email: bweaver@hecweb.org

 

Canoe Country
12 Noon
September 14, 2019

Ride for the Mounds

 

 

Observer Corp Training

 

 

9:30 am – 11:00 AM

 

September 7th 

 

Kennedy Library

 

Register Now

 

Choose a Meeting to Observe

Observers do not speak in meetings

Empowering Voters. Defending Democracy.

Register Now

Only takes a few seconds!

Take notes and report to Observer Corp Leader


If you can attend a government meeting, please take notes and report on it for the rest of us.

Democracy is not a spectator sport

Unless you’re taking notes for the League of Women Voters!

Making Democracy Work!

 

RSVP by sending an email to Julie Mason through any of the register now links above.

Profiles of lesser-known heroines in the fight for women’s rights

 

Daisy Bates


There are many remarkable images online of Daisy Bates, unfortunately none are free to use. Please take the time to  click this link to see several examples of this strong, dedicated, female fighter for equal rights. 

Millie Riley lived a short, brutal life. Only months after giving birth to her daughter in 1914, she was raped, murdered, and her body disposed of in a millpond by three white men. At eight years old, her daughter Daisy Lee Gatson learned what had happened to her mother. She also learned that the men had faced no punishment. At eight years old, she learned that local law enforcement didn’t consider her mother’s murder worth investigating.

“My life now had a secret goal,” Daisy said years later, “to find the men who had done this horrible thing to my mother.” Anger and a desire for vengeance took hold of Daisy at a young age. As an adult, that fire for vengeance would grow into one for justice and she would become a driving force in the integration of schools in the South. But as a young woman, Daisy was full of hate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 If you hate, make it count for something. 

Following the death of her mother, Daisy’s father passed her along to the care of family friends Orlee, a World War I veteran, and Susie Smith. She would never be reunited with her biological father. Young Daisy attended segregated schools and experienced first-hand the poor conditions that were deemed adequate for black students. Orlee Smith died when Daisy was a teenager, which came as a terrible loss. By her own account, she adored the man and couldn’t recall “a time when this man I called my father didn’t talk to me almost as if I were an adult.” Her relationship with Susie Smith was far more fraught and often violent; she “often clobbered, tamed, switched, and made [me] stand in the corner,” Daisy wrote. But it was Orlee’s words and not Susie’s actions that would alter Daisy’s path. 

Consumed by the injustice of her mother’s murder, Daisy sought out the culprits. She caught a man’s eye one day in a commissary and the guilt in his gaze made her certain he’d been involved in Millie’s demise. She became a regular sight at his hang-out, a steady reminder of his crime as the man lived a life of drunkenness. He would once plead to Daisy, “In the name of God, please leave me alone.” He later drank himself to death.

“You’re filled with hatred. Hate can destroy you, Daisy,” Orlee said to her as he lay on his deathbed. “Don’t hate white people just because they’re white. If you hate, make it count for something. Hate the humiliations we are living under in the South. Hate the discrimination that eats away at the South. Hate the discrimination that eats away at the soul of every black man and woman. Hate the insults hurled at us by white scum—and then try to do something about it, or your hate won’t spell a thing.”

 “The perseverance of Mrs. Bates and the Little Rock Nine during these turbulent years sent a strong message throughout the South that desegregation worked and the tradition of racial segregation under ‘Jim Crow’ would no longer be tolerated in the United States of America.”

Daisy Bates became the president of the Arkansas Conference of the NAACP in 1952. With her husband L.C. Bates by her side, she poured her energy into the Arkansas State Press, a newspaper that shined a light on the achievements of the black community in the area, as well as the injustices they faced. She was at the fore-front of the battle for school desegregation when the eyes of the nation turned to Little Rock and the Arkansas governor’s refusal to comply with the federal law established by Brown v. Board of Education. Every step of the way, Daisy experienced resistance, violence, insults, and protests from the white community. The Ku Klux Klan burnt crosses on her lawn at dusk.

It was Daisy who lead the Little Rock Nine, the nine students selected to attend and integrate Central High School, through the hateful, screaming crowds. One of the students, Elizabeth Eckford, recalled the day. “I tried to see a friendly face somewhere in the crowd,” she said, “someone who maybe could help. I looked into the face of an old woman and it seemed a kind face, but when I looked at her again, she spat on me.” Daisy was the point of the spear on this battleground of the Civil Rights Movement. 

During this time, Martin Luther King, Jr. sent word to Daisy, urging her to maintain “a way of non-violence,” even as she and the nine students were “terrorized, stoned, and threatened by ruthless mobs.” He insisted, “World opinion is with you. The moral conscience of millions of white Americans is with you.”

(Daisy) moved to the rural black community of Mitchellville where she worked tirelessly for her neighbors, establishing a program that brought water systems, sewer lines, paved roads, and a community center to the area. 

The governor of Arkansas attempted to delay the date of integration, citing the danger of an increase of violence. He neglected to mention, of course, that the violence was almost entirely initiated by whites who launched on a campaign of terror against the black community with Daisy Bates at the center. Her home was a haven for the Little Rock Nine.

Her home would later be declared a Historic National Landmark. Of its significance, a National Parks publication says, “The perseverance of Mrs. Bates and the Little Rock Nine during these turbulent years sent a strong message throughout the South that desegregation worked and the tradition of racial segregation under ‘Jim Crow’ would no longer be tolerated in the United States of America.”

Though her actions in Little Rock would be her most known, Daisy Bates never stopped working for justice. She later relocated to Washington, D.C. to work with the Democratic National Committee. She headed anti-poverty programs while serving in President Lyndon B. Johnson’s administration. When her health demanded, she returned to Little Rock, then moved to the rural black community of Mitchellville where she worked tirelessly for her neighbors, establishing a program that brought water systems, sewer lines, paved roads, and a community center to the area. 

In 1987, Little Rock opened the Daisy Bates Elementary School, paying tribute to a woman who, in her own elementary years, had been a child in pain and burning with hate. Daisy Lee Gatson Bates died in 1999, a formidable, iron-willed woman who channeled her rage into meaningful change for all the children who followed her.